Summer League Teams Need to Impact Communities All Year

By Josh:

This is not an easy article for me to write. It isn’t that he subject is hard but just having the right words to write down is difficult. Baseball organizations at the college, summer leagues, minor leagues and major league level all have responsibilities. The obvious responsibility is to put a competitive team on the field.  However, a responsibility that is just as important, if not more so, is to give back and to impact the community.

Recently I got to sit down and talk with a leader from one of the local baseball organizations and what he shared with me was amazing to hear, and goes right along with this. He said that this season they had gotten so focused on putting on the games that they had missed a chance to impact the community as much as they desired to do. He made it clear that their goal was to change that this upcoming season and offseason.  They wanted to have a greater impact in the community along with striving to put a winning team on the field.

Read the rest of Summer League Teams Need to Impact Communities All Year via 9 Inning Know It All

Teddy Higuera – Last of the Milwaukee Brewers 20 Game Winners

The last pitcher to win 20 games in a season for the Milwaukee Brewers was left-hander Teddy Higuera back in 1986.  His 20th and final win came on September 25th that year – 30 years ago this week.  Only two other pitchers have won 20 or more games in a season for the Brew Crew, and both came prior to Higuera’s fantastic year.  Mike Caldwell won 22 games in 1978 and Jim Colburn won 20 in 1973.

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Milwaukee Brewers, Teddy Higuera pitch, Historical, 1/19/200

MLB Foul Ball Week in Review (September 12 – September 18): Glove Theft, Umpire Concussion & a Tooth Lost by a Toss Up

The MLB foul ball week in review shows that Major League Baseball ended the week of September 11 – September 18, 2016 with about 162 Foul Ball Facials in 162 days of games. These are only those fans hit in the head area at Major League Baseball games as self-reported on Twitter. That equates to one fan per day of play. It seems like a lot, and it is, but it could be fewer because just over 40% of these tweets indicate the fan wasn’t paying attention. To put that into perspective, it means roughly 45 fans (conservative estimate) would have avoided foul balls to the face had they not been buried in their phones.

But that’s not the only thing going on with foul balls this week. Here’s the rundown of the best and worst foul ball and fan-related actions from the past week:

BOTCHED BOBBLE

This has to be one of the worst feelings in the world of baseball from a fan’s perspective. It was there. It was right there. But this poor Boston Red Sox fan was denied his foul ball

“HOW THE?” IS RIGHT

Washington Nationals’ Ryan Zimmerman managed something I’ve never seen before. He managed to hit himself in the back with his own foul ball. This should count as more proof of the dangers of netting. The foul ball nailed him in the back of the head after it bounced off netting behind home plate in the top of the 8th inning:

 

READ MORE AT FOULBALLZ.COM

Ed Comber (VP Of The BBBA/Owner – foulballz.com)  

Greatest Strength of Mets & Indians is Now Their Biggest Concern, But They’re Not Dead Yet

The old adage in baseball is you can never have enough pitching. While every team can vouch for that, the two organizations currently feeling this the most are the New York Mets and Cleveland Indians.

Heading into 2016, both squads had one clear strength: a solid starting rotation expected to be one of the best in baseball. By solely looking at the cumulative statistics – and paying no mind to who contributed – New York and Cleveland received the kind of production necessary to be on the verge of a playoff berth (via FanGraphs):

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When it comes to fWAR production, the Mets rank second in baseball, while the Indians are second in the American League.

But with October on the horizon, they’ll each be forced to use a much different group than those who toed the line on Opening Day. With a seven-game lead in the American League Central, the Indians are all but assured a spot in the postseason. The Mets still have some work to do with just a one-game cushion in the National League Wild Card race, though.

Each situation is distinctly different, but the Mets and Indians will have a similarly steep hill to climb once the regular season comes to a close, and there seems to be quite a few naysayers.

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Milwaukee Brewers Week in Review: September 12-18

The week in review: The Milwaukee Brewers kicked off last week with a three game series in Cincinnati. They dropped the first two games by scores of 3-0 and 6-4, but rebounded with a convincing 7-0 win. Next up was Chicago with the Cubs on the threshold of clinching the NL Central division title. Milwaukee put their celebration on hold with a 5-4 win on Thursday night, but that was only temporary until St. Louis lost later in the evening. The Crew went on to win the four game series, three games to two. Going into Monday’s action the Brewers are still in fourth place in the NL Central with a 68-82 record, 26.5 games behind Chicago.

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Milwaukee Brewers Research – A Cup of Coffee with Ray Peters

The baseball definition for a “Cup of Coffee” is a short time spent by a minor leaguer at the major league level.  One way a player can get a cup of coffee is via the September call-up when teams are allowed to expand their rosters from 25 players to 40.  Many players joining teams during September make just an appearance or two, and never return to the big leagues.

In 1970, the first year of Milwaukee Brewers baseball, there were two such cup of coffee player appearances.  Both are notable because they came prior to the September call-ups.  Pitcher Ray Peters made just two starts and saw his major league career last about a week.

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Washington Nationals: 2016 Could’ve Been Different if the Winter Went How They Expected

With less than three weeks to go in the regular season, the Washington Nationals are all but assured their third National League East title since 2012. One has to wonder how this year would’ve gone if the offseason went as planned for general manager Mike Rizzo and his front office, though.

Rizzo made an appearance on ESPN’s Baseball Tonight podcast with Buster Olney earlier this week to talk about his club in advance of October. No conversation in 2016 about the Nats is complete without singing the praises of two influential people: manager Dusty Baker and second baseman Daniel Murphy.

They have truly been difference makers for this club, who owns a 87-59 record as they travel to face the Atlanta Braves this weekend. Rizzo didn’t hide how he felt about their contributions this year, referring to Baker as the NL Manager of the Year and Murphy as the NL MVP.

Even if they don’t take home hardware come November, it’s hard to fault Rizzo for feeling this way. It’s just ironic because neither of them were Washington’s first choice when it came to filling their jobs last winter.

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A Letter To Vin Scully

Dear Vin Scully,

Congratulations on your upcoming retirement. You are the greatest. Your voice, your stories, your knowledge and love of the game is unmatched by anyone in the history of baseball.

I didn’t grow up a Dodgers fan, but yet I still loved listening to you. Never before had I heard someone know so much about every player, including the guy at the end of the bench on the visiting team.  You connected fans to the game and the players in a way that I didn’t think was possible.

Read the rest of A Letter To Vin Scully via 9 Inning Know It All

Vin Scully’s Final Game Is Coming

By Josh:

Yesterday Vin Scully officially announced that his final game calling baseball will be October 2nd. Even if the Dodgers make the playoffs he is not going to call any of those games.  I have to be honest this makes me pretty sad and honestly as I sit here trying to figure out what to write my thoughts are so scattered because of what Vin’s retirement means for fans and for baseball.

Read the rest of Vin Scully’s Final Game Is Coming via 9 Inning Know It All

MLB Foul Ball Week in Review (September 5 – September 11): Jim Joyce Wild Pitch Foul Ball,

The MLB foul ball week in review shows that Major League Baseball ended the week of September 5 – September 11, 2016 with about 156 Foul Ball Facials (#FoulBallFacials) in 155 days of games. These are only those fans hit in the head area at Major League Baseball games as self-reported on Twitter. That equates to one fan per day of play. It seems like a lot, and it is, but it could be fewer since nearly 50% of these tweets indicate the fan wasn’t paying attention. To put that into perspective, it means roughly 65 fans (conservative estimate) would have avoided foul balls to the face had they not been buried in their phones.

But that’s not the only thing going on with foul balls this week. Here’s the rundown of the best and worst foul ball and fan-related actions from the past week:

EMPLOYEE OF THE WEEK

How’s this for a day at work as a non-player? I wonder if they got the Atlanta Braves foul ball certificate. Maybe that doesn’t apply to employees who snag foul balls.

THE JIM JOYCE WILD PITCH

I am not at all a fan of Major League Baseball umpires. I especially dislike Jim Joyce and would love to see him leave the game (I’m a lifelong Tigers fan and the image of him blowing a call that cost Tigers starter Armando Galarraga his perfect game is still very fresh in my memory). Last week, I fell for a “foul ball” call by Joyce. Joyce, behind the dish during the Astros – Cleveland Indians game was brutally maligned on Twitter for a wild pitch call on a Chisenhall at-bat. People, including well-respected reporters all jumped on the “Bash Joyce” bandwagon. I am embarrassed to admit my own distaste for the man colored my response too…until I went to the official Major League Baseball rule book. Then I changed my mind. This is the play that awaken the disdain:

As you can see in the replay, the ball hit the dirt nearly a foot before the plate. How any baseball fan doesn’t see that as a wild pitch is bewildering. Actually, it’s a great deal more complicated than that though. Read on.

 

READ THE REST AT FOULBALLZ.COM.

Ed Comber (VP Of The BBBA/Owner – foulballz.com)  

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