Daily Archives: January 18, 2017

The Sons of ’84 Hall of Fame Ballot (If I Had One)

hall of fame logo.jpgWith the 2017 baseball Hall of Fame election results being announced at 6p est tonight, I decided to share who I’d vote for if I had a ballot.

Player’s need 75% of the vote to be elected and those voting can only choose to vote for up to ten players (although not required) out of this year’s list of 34.  Write-in votes are not allowed (sorry Shoeless Joe and Charlie Hustle).

Also, let’s get my steroid stance out of the way first…I believe first that there were far more players abusing steroids than we know and since we don’t know who was clean and who wasn’t, I won’t let it affect my vote.  Second, I think the commissioner and team management are also partially to blame for this issue as they just looked the other way.  Lastly, this isn’t the first time that performance enhancing drugs were an issue in baseball.  Amphetamines were huge in the 70’s & ‘80’s and I’d guess more heavily abused than steroids.  Oh, and don’t give me character clause BS, there are gamblers, racists, and alcoholics in the Hall.

Here’s my list…

Continue reading at Sons of ’84

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Robinson Cano’s 2016 Season Was a Flashback to His Yankee Days

Handing out a lucrative, multi-year contract to a player is always risky for an MLB organization, no matter how much of a no-brainer it appears to be. That risk factor goes through the roof when it’s a 10-year, $240 million deal, like the one Robinson Cano signed prior to the 2014 season.

Outside of a dip in power, his first season in Seattle was a success. He hit .314/.382/.454 with 14 home runs and 82 RBI, producing a wRC+ of 137 and a 5.2 fWAR – the fifth consecutive year he surpassed 5.0.

It was the first half of 2015 when people likely started to freak out, to a degree.

He limped into the All-Star break with a lackluster triple slash of .251/.290/.370, accompanied by just 6 home runs, 30 RBI and an wRC+ of 86. Providing power as a second baseman had always been one of his best attributes, but a .118 first-half ISO showed that the only thing his power was doing was continuing to deteriorate.

Cano did start to look like himself again following the midsummer classic — he hit .331/.387/.540 with 15 home runs, 40 RBI, a wRC+ of 157, and most importantly, his ISO jumped back up to .209.

That second-half performance ended up being a sign of what was to come.

Were there any similarities between 2016 and his prime years in the Bronx from 2010-12 when Cano’s ISO never dipped below .214 while posting a .311/.370/.539 line with a combined 90 homers and 321 RBI?

Yes, but there are also some interesting differences showing how his game has transformed over the years.

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The Greatest Detroit Tiger By Position: Center Field

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As we continue on exploring the greatest Tigers by position of all-time, we move on to what I am guessing is a slam dunk before any research is done.  Before getting to the list however, looking back I’ve covered the all-time best Tigers catcher, first baseman, second baseman, third baseman, shortstop, and left fielder.  You can click on any of the previous links to check out that position.

Moving on to center field, we changed the criteria up a bit for outfielders where I still am looking for at least five years with the Tigers and playing a majority of time at that positon.  The one change I did make however to gaging the outfield spots, is opening it up to majority of games played at that position, but looking at all outfield numbers, since it’s much more common to see a players shift positions.

For the Center Field spot, we have four qualifiers: Ty Cobb, Mickey Stanley, Ron LeFlore, and Chet Lemon. Austin Jackson just misses out being traded mid-way through his 5th season in Detroit, but could be back via free agency this season.  Since this is a shoe in, we’ll take a look at all of the players…

Continue reading @ Sons of ’84

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